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Previous events sponsored by the Australian Institute of Archaeology
 
2011
 
Public Seminars
   

mazarpic

 

"A Land of Milk and Honey": the excavation and scientific research of the unique apiary at Tel Rehov, Israel

A Public Seminar to be given by

Professor Amihai Mazar
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Amihai Mazar is one of Israel’s pre-eminent archaeologists. He held the Eleazar Sukenik Chair in the Archaeology of Israel at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem from 1994 until his retirement in 2010. His special area of research is the archaeology of the Levant in the Bronze and Iron Ages, and he received the Israel Prize for Archaeology in 2009.

He is in Australia as the 2011 Anthony McNicol Visiting Lecturer at Sydney University.

Tel Rehov, the largest site in the Jordan Valley, features Iron Age housing units, the world’s first known apiary, and evidence for trade and foreign contacts that link Rehov to all the great centres of the Biblical world. The lecture will describe the scientific analysis of the apiary and comment on the implications for 10th century chronology in the southern Levant.

Professor Mazar has directed archaeological excavations at a number of sites in Israel that include:

  • Tel Qasile
  • Timnah (Tel Batash) - from 1977–1989
  • Bet She'an - from 1989–1996
  • Rehov (Tel Rehov) - from 1997 onwards (ongoing)

Mazar is a widely-recognised author in the field of Biblical Archaeology, his Archaeology of the Land of the Bible is a standard text in many universities worldwide.

Mazar is married with three children and resides in Jerusalem. He is the nephew of Benjamin Mazar, one of the first generation of pioneering Israeli archaeologists after Independence, and cousin to fellow archaeologist Eilat Mazar.

Saturday 17 September 2011
3:00 - 5:00pm
at the
Australian Institute of Archaeology, Terrace Way, Macleod.

pdf Download PDF

Contact:
Christopher Davey
Mob: 0421 595 966

   

photo

 

Professor Timothy P. Harrison
Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto

Dr. Timothy P. Harrison is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto; a position he filled in 1997. Prior to his appointment at Toronto, he was a Research Associate at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, where he began working on the Megiddo Stratum VI Publication Project. He earned his Ph.D in Near Eastern Archaeology from the University of Chicago in 1995, completing a dissertation on the Early Bronze Age in the Highlands of Central Jordan. He has directed excavations at the Bronze and Iron Age site of Tell Madaba, in Jordan, and currently is directing the Tayinat Archaeological Project excavations on the Plain of Antioch in south-eastern Turkey. These projects form part of a wider, interregional research effort that seeks to shed light on the early development of urban life and state-ordered society amidst the diverse cultures that have given shape to the eastern Mediterranean world. In addition to his own projects, Dr. Harrison has participated in numerous other excavations and field expeditions in Israel, Jordan and Turkey. In 2007, he was elected President of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR).

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on Wednesday 11 May 2011,  12:15pm

The Battle for Armageddon: David, Solomon and the Early Israelite Monarchy as Viewed from Megiddo

The onset of the Iron Age (ca. 1150-950 BCE) brought dramatic changes to the cultural and social landscape of the Biblical World. Corresponding to the period of the Judges, this era witnessed a veritable explosion of small agricultural villages in the highland interior, while the coastal lowlands experienced an ‘urban imposition’, precipitated in large part by migrating Sea Peoples, including the Philistines of biblical fame. The result of these disparate settlement processes was the creation of a mosaic of culturally distinct communities, each vying for supremacy in an increasingly competitive world. Strategically situated at the entrance to a key pass, ancient Megiddo, the Armageddon of biblical Revelation, has long figured prominently in debates about this formative period, out of which emerged the Israelite Monarchy of David and Solomon. Yet, until relatively recently very little was actually known about the Megiddo of this period, a reality that has strongly influenced scholarly interpretations. Rediscovered records of large-scale excavations conducted at the site in the 1920s and 1930s, together with renewed excavations, now offer a rare and expansive glimpse of town life during this tumultuous era. This lecture will review these important archaeological remains, and explore their potential to contribute to the ongoing study of this formative phase in the history of ancient Israel.

 

and on Saturday 14 May 2011, 2:00- 5.15pm

The ' Land of Mēdeba' and Iron Age Moab

Textual sources suggest that the Mādabā Plain region of Central Jordan, the Mishor of the Bible, experienced widespread land use and settlement during the early stages of the Iron Age (ca. 1200-900 BCE), and witnessed the emergence of mature nation-states, most notably the kingdoms of Ammon and Moab. Syntheses of the archaeological record, however, have generally characterized it as a period of limited settlement, marked by loosely confederated alliances and kinship networks; flourishing urban development and political centralization occurred only much later, during the era of Assyrian and Babylonian hegemony. Yet, until recently, this prevailing view has suffered from a lack of carefully excavated cultural sequences, or ‘local histories’, at key sites occupied during this period. The results of recent excavations at Tall Mādabā, the principal Iron Age settlement in the region, are starting to fill this gap. First mentioned in the so called ‘taunt song’ of its northern neighbour Heshbon (cf. Nu. 21: 27-30), Mādabā clearly had emerged as an important regional centre well before the mid-ninth century BCE, and Mesha’s famous acknowledgment that much of the central highland plateau belonged to ‘the Land of Mēdeba’. This lecture will review the results of the ongoing Tall Mādabā Archaeological Project investigations, and explore their implications for current understandings of the historical development of Iron Age Moab.


Temples, Tablets and Assyrian Imperialism at Tayinat on the Orontes

It is generally recognized that an important shift occurred in Assyrian imperial policy during the reign of Tiglath-pileser III (745-727 BCE). Excavations at Tell Tayinat, located on the Plain of Antioch in southeast Turkey, have uncovered the remains of a Late Assyrian settlement, including an Assyrian governor’s residence and, most recently, a temple and a cache of cuneiform tablets dating to this period. Historical sources attest that Tayinat was destroyed by Tiglath-pileser III in 738 BCE, and then transformed into an Assyrian provincial capital equipped with its own governor and imperial administration. The Tayinat excavations thus offer a rare opportunity to examine the physical dimensions of one of history’s earliest and most successful experiments in imperialism. This lecture will present the latest discoveries of the Tayinat Archaeological Project from this period. They reveal a carefully crafted visual landscape that both manifested and reinforced the ideology of the Assyrian imperial project.

pdf Download PDF

Contact:
Christopher Davey
Mob: 0421 595 966

   
2011 Petrie Oration by Dr. Tim Harrison - Taita and the 'Land of Palistin’: Recent Discoveries at Tell Tayinat and Vicinity
photo


The Lecture:
The University of Toronto excavations at Tell Tayinat, on the Plain of Antioch, have begun to uncover the remains of an extensive settlement from the Early Iron Age (ca. 1200-900 BCE) . The emerging archaeological picture points to the rise of a powerful regional kingdom associated with ‘the Land of Palistin’, comprised of an intriguing amalgam of Aegean, Anatolian (Luwian) and Bronze Age West Syrian cultural traditions. This lecture will review the results of the ongoing Tayinat Archaeological Project investigations, and the historical insights they have provided to date.

Tim Harrison is a professor in Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto in Canada, and President of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR).

This public lecture is made possible by the Australian Institute of Archaeology and the Classical Association of victoria

Wednesday 11 May 2011
6:30 pm (Tea and Coffee available beforehand)

Prince Phillip Theatre,
Architecture Building,
University of Melbourne

Admission Free

Enquiries:to June McBeth
8344 5142
jmcbeth@unimelb.edu.au
http://shaps.unimelb.edu.au

Download PDF

 
 
2010
 
2010 Lecture Series

Archaeology and the Bible

This is an opportunity to hear the lectures prepared by the Australian Institute of Archaeology that are being delivered remotely by Ridley College for tertiary students.

The subject traces the history of archaeology from the start of excavations at Herculaneum in 1713 to the recent development of post-processual archaeology and explores the way this endeavour has influenced the study of the Bible. It describes the significant archaeological investigators, their background, work and contribution to archaeological practice and methodology. The circumstances of all major biblical archaeological discoveries are also dealt with. The lecture program is organised thematically and chronologically over twelve weeks.


Presenter: Christopher Davey, Director of the Australian Institute of Archaeology

Place and Time: Australian Institute of Archaeology, Building EC 11, Terrace Way, MacLeod ( Melways 873-4)
8pm on Mondays as per the Program

Program:

26 July

Archaeology in the Classical World and the New Testament

2 August

Egypt: Looting, Recording, Reading and Regulating

9 August

Assyria: Discovery, Despoiling and the Decipherment of Cuneiform

16 August

Historical Geography and Palestine

30 August

Geology, Archaeology and Prehistory

6 September

Early Excavations in Egypt and the Palestine

13 September

Archaeology in Syria, Iran, Turkey and Lebanon: Archive and Alphabet

20 September

Albright and the Beginning of Biblical Archaeology

27 September

Archaeology in the Southern Levant after World War II

4 October

The ‘New Archaeology’ and the Demise of Biblical Archaeology

18 October

Archaeology and the Bible Today, and Post-Processualism

25 October

The future of Archaeology in Bible Lands


Lectures are free to members and volunteers of the Australian Institute of Archaeology.

For others there is a charge of $5 per lecture.

Contact:
Christopher Davey
Mob: 0421 595 966

 
 
2010 Petrie Oration by Dr. Thomas W. Davis - St. Paul on Cyprus: Transformation of an Apostle


The Lecture:
Recent archaeological work on Cyprus allows a much better understanding of the context of the St Paul’s visit underscoring the cultural accuracy of the Acts account. A clearer picture of first century Cyprus is emerging, as a complex multi-cultural entity looking both east and west. These internal cultural divisions of the province explain the change of Saul, the apostle to the Jews to Paul the apostle to the Gentiles.

Thomas W. Davis is the director of the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute in Nicosia, Cyprus. Dr. Davis has an extensive experience in archaeological excavation in Cyprus, Jordan, Egypt, and in the United States, where he has substantial archaeological experience in cultural resource management. He is the author of Shifting Sands: The Rise and Fall of Biblical Archaeology (Oxford, 2004), as well as numerous essays and articles that concern archaeology and biblical studies. Dr. Davis earned his Ph.D. in Oriental Studies—Syro-Palestinian Archaeology, at the University of Arizona, under the direction of William G. Dever. He also earned his M.A. at Arizona, with a minor in Biblical Studies, and the B.A. from Wheaton College in Illinois.

Friday 27 August 2010
7:30 for 8:00 pm (Tea and Coffee available beforehand)

Australian Institute of Archaeology
Building EC 11, La Trobe University
Terrace Way, MacLeod ( Melways 873-4)

Admission Free

Inquiries:- Christopher Davey 0421 595 966

Download PDF

 
 
Dr. Thomas W. Davis - The Rise and Fall of Biblical Archaeology: Towards a new Paradigm


Dr. Davis is the Director of the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute. The Seminar will trace the history of the Albright/Wright Biblical Archaeology paradigm and suggest a new way forward out of the current maximalist/minimalist impasse.

Saturday 28 August 2010
2:00 to 4:00 pm

Australian Institute of Archaeology
Building EC 11, La Trobe University
Terrace Way, MacLeod ( Melways 873-4)

Admission Free

Inquiries:- Christopher Davey 0421 595 966

Download PDF

 

Thomas W. Davis’ other lectures in Australia:-

Aug 24 7:00pm NEAF (Sydney Uni) Current Cypriot Archaeology
Aug 25 10:30am Macquarie University St. Paul on Cyprus: Transformation of an Apostle
  7:00pm Macquarie University The Sand Dwellers: New evidence from New Kingdom Sinai
Aug 26 3.00pm La Trobe University Current Cypriot Archaeology
Aug 31 1:00pm Melbourne University Current Cypriot Archaeology
  8:00pm Monash University The Sand Dwellers: New evidence from New Kingdom Sinai
Sept 1 6:30pm CAV (Melbourne Uni) Shaken and Stirred: Cyprus in the fourth century AD
Sept 2 5:30pm Uni of New England The Rise and Fall of Biblical Archaeology
   
   

2009

   
Dr. Bruce Winter - First Corinthians off the Rocks: Archaeological Resolutions of its Enigmas

Dr Winter is Principal of the Queensland Theological College and the Director of the Institute for Early Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World. He is also a Senior Research Fellow of Macquarie University, a member of British Epigraphic Society and the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas.

Formerly he was a Fellow of St Edmund's College, University of Cambridge, where he remains a visiting scholar, and he was also the Warden of Tyndale House for 20 years. He has visited Corinth annually over the past 15 years with doctoral students and research fellows.

Friday 7 August 2009
8:00pm

Australian Institute of Archaeology
Building EC 11, La Trobe University
Terrace Way, MacLeod
Melways 475

Download PDF

 

   
   
Dr. Alexander Weiss - Were there any upper-class members amongst the first Christians?


The answer to the question posed in the title of this paper is: It depends. It depends first on how you define “upper-class members” in contemporary Roman society. My proposal will be to restrict this term to the ‘political elite’. It depends secondly on the position one takes in the vexed question of whether those NT passages, which report the conversion of persons belonging to the ‘political elite’, are ‘fact or fiction’. German theologians in particular tend to opt for the latter and,  consequently, to hold the view that there were no Christians coming from the socio-political elite before the end of the second century. But one can also argue with good reason that the relevant passages were not fictitious - and that there were upper-class members amongst the first Christians.


Tuesday 26 May 2009
8:00pm

Australian Institute of Archaeology
Building EC 11, La Trobe University
Terrace Way, MacLeod
Melways 475

Download PDF


 

 

2008

 
Public Lectures presented by Prof James K. Hoffmeier 2008

 

New Light on the Route of the Exodus from Egypt
Monday 21 July 2008
7:45pm
Chapel, Bible College of Victoria,
71 Albert Hill Road,
Lilydale

Download PDF


The Sea Peoples Invasion of Egypt: New Evidence
Tuesday 22 July 2008
8:00pm
Lecture Theatre E7 - Building 72
Monash University, Clayton Campus

Download PDF

 

 

Moses and the Israelite Sojourn in Egypt
Thursday 24 July 2008
7:00 for 7:30
Australian Institute of Archaeology
Building EC 11, La Trobe University
Terrace Way, MacLeod
Melways 475

Download PDF

 

2008 Petrie Oration

New Evidence for the Amarna Period on the East
Frontier of Egypt
Friday 25 July
7:00 for 7:30
Australian Institute of Archaeology
Building EC 11, La Trobe University
Terrace Way, MacLeod
Melways 475

Download PDF


 

 

2007

 
Recent archaeological work in the Teti Cemetery at Saqqara, Egypt presented by Dr Naguib Kanawati AM

The 2007 Petrie Oration, presented by Dr Naguib Kanawati AM, Professor of Egyptology, Macquarie University

Recent archaeological work in the Teti Cemetery at Saqqara, Egypt

The lecture will include recent discoveries from the Teti cemetery, some of which were recorded in the press earlier in the year, and the recording of the tomb of Mereruka and new information gained from it.

Naguib Kanawati is an Egyptologist with a special interest in the Old Kingdom. He graduated BA in History and Archaeology and MA in Egyptology at the University of Alexandria, Egypt and obtained his PhD in Egyptology from Macquarie University. After six years of teaching Near-Eastern History at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, he came to Macquarie University in 1980 as Lecturer in Egyptology and in 1990 was appointed to a Personal Chair in Egyptology. In 1981 he established the Rundle Foundation for Egyptian Archaeology (now with 600 members) and in 1989 he established the Australian Centre for Egyptology and remains its Director. In 1997 Prof Kanawati was elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, in 2003 he received the Centenary Medal “for services to the Australian society and the humanities in the study of archaeology” and in 2007 he was appointed as a Member of the Order of Australia.

Date: Friday 17th August 2007

Time: 7pm for 7.30pm

Location:
Undercroft Lecture Theatre
David Myers Building
La Trobe University
(Use Car Park 2)
Melways Map 473 - Click to view Map

Inquiries: Christopher Davey
Tel: 0421 595 966 - Email: director@aiarch.org.au

Admission FREE

Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download flyer (colour)
   
Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download flyer (black/white)
   
Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download map (black/white)


 

The Australian Institute of Archaeology and the National Centre for Hellenic Studies and Research at La Trobe University invite you to a FREE Public Lecture

New light on the Greek ‘Dark Age’: cult continuity in sanctuaries at Miletus and Kalapodi

presented by Prof. Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier
Director - The German Archaeological Institute at Athens

 

 

 

After holding professorships at Freiburg and Heidelberg Universities, Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier took up the position of Director of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens. A specialist in the Aegean Bronze Age, Professor Niemeier has excavated extensively in Crete, as well as on the Greek mainland, in southern Italy, Israel and Turkey. He is currently director of the German Archaeological Institute excavations at Miletus (Turkey), the Athenian Kerameikos (Greece), Kalapodi (ancient Phokis, Greece) and the Samos Heraion (Greece). Prof Niemeier is widely published and well respected in his field, as evidenced by the many guest lectures he has delivered throughout Germany, the USA, Great Britain, France, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Russia, Austria and now Australia as the 2007 AAIA Visiting Professor.

Date: Thursday 6th September 2007

Time: 7:00pm

Location:
National Centre for Hellenic Studies & Research (NCHSR)
Ernest Jones Drive, Macleod
La Trobe University
Melways Map 473 - Click to view Map

Inquiries:

Steve Petrou
Mob: 0416 252 722
Tel: 03 9479 3177

or

Christopher Davey
Tel: 0421 595 966
Email: director@aiarch.org.au

Admission FREE

Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download flyer (colour)
   
Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download flyer (black/white)
   
Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download map (black/white)

 


Public Lecture - Incantation Bowls: A Mesopotamian Phenomenon

Dr. Erica Hunter is Affiliated Lecturer in Hebrew and Aramaic at the Faculty of Oriental Studies University of Cambridge. She is also Teaching Fellow in Eastern Christianity at the Department for the Study of Religions School of Oriental and African Studies.

Between 1988 - 2000 she was Gertrude Bell Fellow of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq where she researched the collection of incantation bowls held in the Iraq Museum in Baghdad. She has published numerous articles on incantation bowls and was a major contributor to J.B. Segal (with a contribution by Erica C.D. Hunter) Catalogue of Aramaic and Mandaic Incantation Bowls in the Iraq Museum (British Museum Press: London 2000).

Date: Wednesday 27th June 2007
Time: 7pm for 7.30pm
Location: Australian Institute of Archaeology - Click here for location details
Inquiries: Christopher Davey
Tel: 0421 595 966 - Email: director@aiarch.org.au

Admission FREE

Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download printable flyer

 


2006

 

Public Lecture - What Did the Ancient Israelites Really Believe?

Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages at Denver Seminary. Professor Hess has written the Tyndale Commentary on the book of Joshua as well as many other books and articles in the field of Old Testament

Date: Friday 24th March 2006
Time: 7pm for 7.30pm
Location: Grigg Theatre, Ridley College, 271 Royal Parade, Melbourne
Inquiries: Matthew Martin
Tel: (03) 9853 3177 - Email:admin@mcd.edu.au
or
Christopher Davey
Tel: 0421 595 966 - Email: director@aiarch.org.au

Admission FREE

Professor Hess - Public Lecture - 24 March 2006 Download printable flyer

 

Seminar

The Melbourne College of Divinity and the Australian Institute of Archaeology invite Staff & Faculty to a Seminar presented by Professor Richard Hess

Text and Writing in Ancient Palestine

Date: Friday 24th March 2006
Time: 5.00 - 6.00pm
Location: Grigg Theatre, Ridley College, 271 Royal Parade, Melbourne
RSVP: Wednesday 22nd March
Contact: Matthew Martin - Tel: (03) 9853 3177 - Email:admin@mcd.edu.au

Professor Hess - Seminar - 24 March 2006 Download printable flyer

 

Lecture - Thursday 2 February 2006 - Professor Colin Humphreys CBE - The Miracles of Exodus

On 2 February 2006 the Institute hosted Professor Colin Humphreys. Colin Humphreys is professor of materials at Cambridge University and author of the recent book The Miracles of Exodus : A Scientist's Discovery of the Extraordinary Natural Causes of the Biblical Stories.

About 150 people attended the lecture related to his work on the Exodus tradition. The Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt is one of the most important events in world history. In this talk Professor Humphreys reconstructed in detail the evidence for the final Exodus miracle, the crossing of the River Jordan, and also suggested a new site for Mount Sinai. The talk was illustrated by some rare photographs.

Sponsored by:
Australian Institute of Archaeology
Australian Evangelical Alliance
Ridley College

 


2005

2005 Flinders Petrie Oration

The Australian Institute of Archaeology and The Department of Archaeology, LaTrobe University invite you to the 2005 Flinders Petrie Oration to be delivered by Edwin Judge Emeritus Professor of History, Macquarie University.

On this Rock I will build my Church: Counter-cultic springs of Multiculturalism?

Friday 18 November, 2005
7:30 for 8.00 pm
GSM Lecture Theatre (map overleaf)
LaTrobe University, Springthorpe Boulevard.

Free Admission

Emeritus Professor Judge is a former Director of the Ancient History Documentary Research Centre at Macquarie University, which publishes the series 'New Documents Illustrating Early Christianity'.

His lecture will use epigraphic and other evidence to probe the question of whether the New Testament churches were like cult-groups of their day, and what this has to do with multiculturalism today.

Location of the GSM Theatre - The GSM Theatre is not on the main campus, view map here.

Exhibitions

A History of Writing, at the Potter Museum, Swanston Street, University of Melbourne.
Opened 14 August 2003 and continuing until February 2006.
For details contact 03 8344 4484.

The catalogue for the exhibition is still available at a cost of $7. If you wish to purchase the catalogue, please contact the Director on 0421 595 966 or email here.

 

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