The Journal of 

The Australian Institute of Archaeology

Buried History publishes papers and reviews based on the results of research relating to Eastern Mediterranean, Near Eastern and Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy and the Biblical text, and the history of such research and archaeology generally for an informed readership.

Current Issue 2018 Volume 54
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Table of Contents

Luis R. Siddall, Carla A. Raymond and Joseph J. Bevitt, Hidden Text: Imaging and reading an ancient tablet encased in an envelope,    3 - 10


Luis R. Siddall, Wayne Horowitz and Peter Zilberg, Old Babylonian clay bullae from Lagaba in the Australian Institute of Archaeology and other collections,     11  - 14


Carla A. Raymond and Joseph J. Bevitt, Charlie ‘unwrapped’: a scientific investigation of a mummified votive offering in the Australian Institute of Archaeology collection,   15 - 22


Christopher J. Davey, The Roman merchant ship sail plan,   23 - 32


Jodie L. Mitchell and Soren Blau, The 1954 Excavation of Tombs at Tauchira and Euesperides, Libya,  33 - 44

Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, and Michael G. Hasel, In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City, New York: Thames and Hudson, 2018; review by Christopher J. Davey    45 - 6


Mobile Ed: AR101 Archaeology in Action: Biblical Archaeology in the Field, Logos Mobile Education and Lexham Press, 2015–2016, reviewed by Christopher J. Davey   47 - 8

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Papers

Reviews

Hidden Text: Imaging and reading an ancient tablet encased in an envelope

Luis R. Siddall, Carla A. Raymond and Joseph J. Bevitt

 

A tablet from Nimrud, which is encased in an inscribed clay envelope IA5.074 (ND 3430), was imaged at the Australian Synchrotron Imaging Medical Beamline (IMBL). This confirmed that there was a cuneiform tablet inside the envelope, the text of which could be read. The paper provides the details of the imaging, describes the tomography, offers a reading of the enclosed tablet and comments on the variation between the text on the envelope and tablet and the significance of this for Assyrian contract law.

Old Babylonian clay bullae from Lagaba in the Australian Institute of Archaeology and other collections

Luis R. Siddall, Wayne Horowitz and Peter Zilberg

 

The paper identifies 16 bullae held by the Australian Institute of Archaeology, Israel Museum, Jerusalem, the Otago Museum, Dunedin, and Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney that have a shared date and provenance. It discusses the nature of the Institute’s bullae and identifies the provenance and accession paths to their respective institutions. They date specifically to either year 6 or 7 of the reign of Samsuiluna, King of Babylon (1744–1743 BC, middle chronology) and they come from the Old Babylonian city of Lagaba.

Charlie ‘unwrapped’: a scientific investigation of a mummified votive offering in the Australian Institute of Archaeology collection

Carla A. Raymond and Joseph J. Bevitt

The research undertaken on the mummified animal (IA1.2402) to establish its authenticity, identity, age and provenance is described. A combination of established and novel non-destructive imaging techniques, including X-ray computed tomography (CT) and neutron computed tomography (NCT) made possible a detailed study of the mummy’s content, which was found to be a partial skeleton of a juvenile cat. Use of both techniques allowed for dual contrast and complementary study of bones, soft tissue, and textile components. NCT provided valuable insights into wrapping techniques used in the mummification process. Acquisition of radiocarbon dates provided quantitative results to compare with morphological observations and conclusions based on partiality of the contents. All techniques were employed to better define and profile the specimen within its historical, social and religious contexts, while causing as little physical disruption as possible

The Roman merchant ship sail plan

Christopher J. Davey

 

Two papers about the introduction of the spritsail during the Roman-period in previous editions of Buried History are updated with additional references and hypotheses. A revised interpretation of Problem 7 in the Aristotelian corpus Mekhanika is given but the foregoing proposition that the introduction of spritsails made sailing to windward routine for Roman merchant sailing ships is retained. It is suggested that extremes of wind strength were the main inhibitors of windward sailing because it reduced boat speed, which in turn diminished lateral resistance and increased leeway. 

The 1954 Excavation of Tombs at Tauchira and Euesperides, Libya

Jodie L. Mitchell and Soren Blau

In 1954, Walter Beasley, the founder of the Australian Institute of Archaeology (the Institute), financially supported a young Australian archaeologist, G.R.H. Wright, to excavate tombs at Tauchira, near modern Tocra, and Euesperides, in present day Benghazi, Libya.  Excavations produced artefacts some of which were sent to the Institute for its museum collection.  This paper alerts scholars to the Institute’s holdings from the excavations at Tauchira and Euesperides. 
 

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